Cage To Big or Wrong Location of Food Dish

John33871

New Member
i had a baby veiled chameleon, it died a month ago, and im still wondering why, i went back to researching, and think i may have come up with the possible problem i had. i had a huge cage for my little guy, he was only around 4 inches long, head to tail. he was in a 65 gallon cage set up, with trees, and branches going all over his cage. i had his feeder cups at the top of the cage, where he always would sit, i read that i should put them at the bottom. is this true do to the fact that they like to hunt and would look down into it, or would this not cause much of a problem. my main problem with my chameleon was that he never ate, so i thought this could have played a part in his death. also his humidity was to low, around the 50%. he started shedding, but was never unable to get a small pieace of dead skin from his head. the vet said this caused an eye infection, but i think the lack of food, lead to this. so when i get my next chameleon, should i place the food dishes at the bottom, get a smaller cage, build my own cage to keep humidity at a good percentage. anyone got any good advice for me, or know if the location of the food dish could have played a part in the death of my chameleon, thanks for any help or advice!
 

ChameleonsTree

New Member
Personally i let the insects be free range but the cup placement isnt crucial...most put it midway up so that the chameleon can shoot down into it.
Chameleons stop eating generally when they are sick. Other reasons can be they are sick of the type of insect you are feeding them. Most times though are cause they are sick. How long did you have the chameleon before he became sick?
 

Jordan

New Member
I agree with Chameleon Tree's statements.

I also free range my feeders. No experience with cup feeding all the time. I do place a plastic bowl at the base of the plants for worms, if I do not hand feed them to them. They know this location and check it often. The humidity seems okay as long as it increases with mistings.

I would try again with a larger chameleon to start off. If a veiled perhaps 7-9" range. I would have to agree that the cage seems rather large considering the size of the chameleon.
 
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Lenny

New Member
When I started out with my little veiled (he was about 4 inches then...maybe less) I put him in a 65 gallon cage too in which he still lives. I'm glad that he turned out ok. But what's exactely is the problem when a cage is to big? Isn't the wild just one huge cage?
 

Prism Chameleons

Established Member
Hi all,

A baby chameleon should always have a smaller cage habitat in order for them to reach their feeders and not be too overwhelmed with trying to catch their food. Plus, a fall from a high branch in a large cage could be harmful as well. Typically, the rule of thumb is to have a smaller cage size of around 18" x 12" x 12" for a smaller chameleon up to around 4-5 months of age. I also free roam my feeders as it gives them an opportunity to excercise and hunt and it also keeps their tongue in shape for catching their prey. Be careful with the basking light in this small of cage, as baby chameleons can burn easily. Use a lower wattage bulb and keep the distance at least 6-12 inches away from the basking area, however, check the temperature and you should have a range of around 80 - 90 degrees for their basking.

Once your chameleon is around 6-7 months of age (males) you can move up to a larger cage habitat. They are then large enough to catch their prey with ease and feel more secure in a large caging system than a young baby chameleon.

Hope this helps!
 

John33871

New Member
i had him for about 3 weeks before he got sick. i tried giving him worms but he would not eat them. i also let some crickets free range, but i had a problem with my cage, and the crickets could escape from the cage, and get out. so i think i might get a better made, smaller cage when i get my next chameleon. i will let the crickets free range. thanks for all the help, just cant wait for the spring now so i can get my new chameleon. maybe ill get one next month after christmas.
 

Steven Scott

New Member
i had a baby veiled chameleon, it died a month ago, and im still wondering why, i went back to researching, and think i may have come up with the possible problem i had. i had a huge cage for my little guy, he was only around 4 inches long, head to tail. he was in a 65 gallon cage set up, with trees, and branches going all over his cage. i had his feeder cups at the top of the cage, where he always would sit, i read that i should put them at the bottom. is this true do to the fact that they like to hunt and would look down into it, or would this not cause much of a problem. my main problem with my chameleon was that he never ate, so i thought this could have played a part in his death. also his humidity was to low, around the 50%. he started shedding, but was never unable to get a small pieace of dead skin from his head. the vet said this caused an eye infection, but i think the lack of food, lead to this. so when i get my next chameleon, should i place the food dishes at the bottom, get a smaller cage, build my own cage to keep humidity at a good percentage. anyone got any good advice for me, or know if the location of the food dish could have played a part in the death of my chameleon, thanks for any help or advice!
I'm pretty new at chameleon owning but I got a 30 by 16 by 16 cage and I have him range feeding because he won't eat by hand had to force feed him the first damealworms but then the next day he was range feeling he ate 12 crickets in 20 minutes I only ate two mealworms that day and only one the next so I found he doesn't care for me at 1 but you like cilantro.he likes Kale he likes collard greens he's been doing fine ever since I've been in range just gut load crickets turn them loose in the cage with a net just cute enough vegetation make sure you get some of calcium vitamins protein nutrients water and misted arounb50-60 percent you should be fine
 

Steven Scott

New Member
And my chameleons for roughly three weeks his name is lenford he loves cilantro cricket and collard greens and he'll eat mealworms and kale I just wishes colors would show more any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
And my chameleons for roughly three weeks his name is lenford he loves cilantro cricket and collard greens and he'll eat mealworms and kale I just wishes colors would show more any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
@Steven Scott Your he is a she. I strongly suggest starting your own thread and fill out the help sheet so that forum members can review all of your husbandry and make sure all is correct for your lovely lady.

Here is some recommended information to include when asking for help in the health clinic forum. By providing this information you will receive more accurate and beneficial responses. It might not be necessary to answer all these questions, but the more you provide the better. Please remember that even the most knowledgeable person can only guess at what your problem may be. Only an experienced reptile veterinarian who can directly examine your animal can give a true diagnosis of your chameleon's health.


Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.
Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?
Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.

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Please Note:
  1. The more details you provide the better and more accurate help you will receive.
  2. Photos can be very helpful.
 
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