Baby male and female chameleons same cage/seperated

I have a baby male and baby female panther chameleons. They are in separate cages and don't know of eachother. However I have another cage that is huge. 125?150?galllon tank and was wondering if i could divide the center with mesh and have them life in the same cage.
I only want to do this so cause I can regulate the temperature and humidity in the same cage.
Will it make the chameleons more stressed out or will they eventually accept eachother.
 

mardithepanther

New Member
It will definately stress them out. you have to divide with something they cant see through. Is it a glass or screen cage? if its glass i just wouldnt reccomend it at all. what are the dimensions?
 
I was hoping to have it be screen down the center cause I only have one humidity/thermomenter controller and it would be much easier to care for and keep a constant temperature. Its really an old 150gallon aquarium tank. About the length of a 3/4 person couch so they would be able to hide from eachother. I was just cuirios cause I always see picstures of peoples cages side by side.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Usually the cages that are side by side have a visual divider of some sort up, because the sight of other chameleons can really freak some animals out. The glass is not an issue in this case, because it can centainly make regulating temps and humidity much easier especially if you live up north - BUT, since it's an aquarium it doesn't provide a lot of ventillation, unlike special made vivariums do. So if they're really young I think it's ok, but not for the long-term. Also, because they are male and female, he will be ready to breed long before she is, and will probably dedicate a chunk of his day to trying to woo her through the screen, and she will be annoyed and stressed. Or, worse, she may be pushed into producing eggs earlier from the sight of him, and that can be really tough on a young female.

Most importantly, however, is keeping her temperatures cooler than his if you want her to not produce infertile eggs for a while. This is an excellent blog to read: http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/2007/12/keeping-female-veiled.html If you keep her cooler and on a strict diet she will live longer without producing any/as many eggs in her lifetime. You'd want to start this technique at about 5.5 months, so you don't have to change anything yet, but keep that in mind.

So basically, I would scrap the idea if I were in your shoes. It's easier to get them both their own enclosures and set those up. It doesn't take too long to ensure that the bulbs are putting out the proper heat and to get a misting schedule that maintains humidity in the right range.
 
MHMH interesting. That is probably for the best.
So they wont start to memorize eachothers presence or are they just hardwired to be solitary.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
What are the dimensions of the cage? It sounds like it would be big enough and could work as long as you use an opaque divider so they can't see each other.
 
umm its about 6/7 feet long...2 feet wide..and 3 feet high. Could I put a screen mesh and then heavily cover both sides of it with that think fake cannabis plant.
 

Leslie11

Member
Dividing

Walmart sells a rubber self paper that is black with tiny holes, that you can cut. My chams are in separate cages, but close to each other. I use this stuff between all my cages. My chams do not seem stressed. Females are on one side of the room, and males on the other side. Not expensive to try.
 

fleetwoodchams

New Member
Usually the cages that are side by side have a visual divider of some sort up, because the sight of other chameleons can really freak some animals out. The glass is not an issue in this case, because it can centainly make regulating temps and humidity much easier especially if you live up north - BUT, since it's an aquarium it doesn't provide a lot of ventillation, unlike special made vivariums do. So if they're really young I think it's ok, but not for the long-term. Also, because they are male and female, he will be ready to breed long before she is, and will probably dedicate a chunk of his day to trying to woo her through the screen, and she will be annoyed and stressed. Or, worse, she may be pushed into producing eggs earlier from the sight of him, and that can be really tough on a young female.

Most importantly, however, is keeping her temperatures cooler than his if you want her to not produce infertile eggs for a while. This is an excellent blog to read: http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/2007/12/keeping-female-veiled.html If you keep her cooler and on a strict diet she will live longer without producing any/as many eggs in her lifetime. You'd want to start this technique at about 5.5 months, so you don't have to change anything yet, but keep that in mind.

So basically, I would scrap the idea if I were in your shoes. It's easier to get them both their own enclosures and set those up. It doesn't take too long to ensure that the bulbs are putting out the proper heat and to get a misting schedule that maintains humidity in the right range.

I have a male that doesn't seem to mind other males. In that I mean he doesn't gape or puff when he sees males or females. He is right next to another male's cage but when I move the barrier to clean cages he just does care the other male is there.
He is about 7 months old now.
A wonderful and gentle cham however. Loves to be held and hand fed.
Is this normal?

* By the way I use Heavy freezer paper between the cages. It has waxed sides that repel water and is cheap and easy to replace.


Thanks
 
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