Anyone know how to pair

Chameleoking

Avid Member
What do you mean "pair"? If you mean live together in same enclosure, It's just not good to do at all with any chameleons. I have heard of some smaller species being housed together. But it really isn't a safe way to go.
Now if you have a really huge enclosure, and I mean HUGE. Its possible to house two together. But it would still be a very risky situation.
 

Bubblestheousaletchameleo

Established Member
What do you mean "pair"? If you mean live together in same enclosure, It's just not good to do at all with any chameleons. I have heard of some smaller species being housed together. But it really isn't a safe way to go.
Now if you have a really huge enclosure, and I mean HUGE. Its possible to house two together. But it would still be a very risky situation.
No not like in the same enclosure like to breed
 

Chameleoking

Avid Member
My recommendation is to start with a juvenile pair. The reason is twofold. Firstly, you can be more assured of an actual pair, and secondly they’ll be past the risky stage of development. I’d avoid starting with an adult pair because you never know how old they are, and it would be unfortunate to start with a retired breeder. It’s also best to start with a captive bred pair if possible, rather than imports, as there is less risk of stress and parasitization.
Once you have a pair, I’d recommend keeping them in separate cages. While you can successfully keep a breeding pair of chameleons together all the time, there’s a saying: “Absence makes the heart grow fonder.” I’ve found this to be true with chameleon breeding.
Raise your chameleons to adult size before you attempt to have them breed. The reason is, it’s dangerous to have a sub-adult female lay eggs, because her body is still trying to grow. Forcing her to produce eggs, gestate, and lay her clutch is tremendously demanding of her body. In short, breeding your female chameleon before she’s an adult will shorten her life. Patience is a virtue here
 

Chameleoking

Avid Member
Once you’ve raised your pair of chameleons to adult size, you’re ready for the introduction phase. I usually take the female and place her gently into the male’s enclosure, but in my experience it also works vice-versa. The theory is that if you place the female into the male’s territory, he’ll be more aggressive and will want to show his dominance by breeding her.

Monitor the female closely. The next several seconds tell you everything you need to know about whether mating will take place. Mating will only be successful if she’s ovulating, and it’s not something that’s always visually apparent. The only real way to tell if she’s receptive is to focus on her reaction to the male.

The male will immediately take notice of her and will most likely start moving towards her. If she’s not receptive, she’ll either quickly try to run away from the male, or she’ll start gaping (hissing with mouth open) towards him, or both. If she’s receptive, she’ll walk slowly, and will seemingly not pay much attention to the male’s advances. She’ll then allow mating, which takes anywhere from 5-30 minutes.

If she’s not receptive, remove her immediately because she could get injured by the male, and try again in a few days. If she is receptive, allow the chameleons to breed for 30 minutes or so. If you want to be thorough, leave them together for 24 hours and then remove the female.
 
Top Bottom