Any body can give me some tips new Jackson chameleon

Just got him 3 days ago rescued from pet shop tell me how I’m doing please advice will be greatly appreciated also need to pick which name would be best Cutter or Casper
  • Your Chameleon - Jackson, I’ve had him for 3 days
  • Handling - Held him first day haven’t since
  • Feeding - crickets he won’t try super worms yet idk why but he ate 9 crickets the second day and he only ate 3 this morning. I feed him in the morning but I may try to feed him when I get home I get home about 5 something i gut loaded them by feeding the crickets carrots and lettuce and and potato's
  • Supplements - in the attached photos and I haven’t cover them with it yet due to the pet store staying they already did it this week so I don’t want to over do it I plan on doing it starting next week
  • Watering - i have a mist king that I filtered water in it and it goes off 3 times a day first 3 mins at 8:30. Second one is at 12 for 3 mins and the 3 is at 5:30 for 4 mins and I do not ever see him drinking due to me being at work when it goes off I will see this weekend if he does since this will be the first official weekend id have him for also when I first wake up I mist with my filter spray bottle on the plants just in case he is thirsty
  • Fecal Description - haven’t seen any I only had him for a little awhile still just 3 days and I haven’t had him tested yet
  • History - the pet store couldn’t tell me anything because they didn’t no… shameful

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - extra large screen cage I’ll add the photos
  • Lighting - lighting in the extra photos but the basking buld is 100 w eco smart
  • Temperature - 69 sometimes in middle 70s after mister lowest at night is 68 I know because I have a gun thing that tells me the temp when I point at it
  • Humidity - im not sure I don’t have anything to let me know what it is but I have the misting going and I have shower curtains on the side to keep the humity at a certain level.. I’m trying
  • Plants - corn plant and a Lucca also in picture
  • Placement - he sat high up as you can see in the added picture and no vent is near him in our guest bed room which no one is in but he is near a window
  • Location - I live in Florida

 

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Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
  • Feeding - crickets he won’t try super worms yet idk why but he ate 9 crickets the second day and he only ate 3 this morning. I feed him in the morning but I may try to feed him when I get home I get home about 5 something i gut loaded them by feeding the crickets carrots and lettuce and and potato's
He looks very thin, but it's a great sign that he is eating. I'd pretty much feed him as much as he will take for the next month or two. But be very careful not to overfeed him past a healthy weight, or he will definitely become obese. You want him to gain weight, but not so much so that his casque (top head structure) becomes puffy or that he gains fat along his spinal ridge. Another good indication is that you don't want his arms to become puffy. You can always post a picture on the forums in a month for us to double-check his weight. But for now, he just needs to gain weight.

It's strange how he won't eat the super worms. How are you offering the super worms and crickets? The easiest and best way (IMO) is to cup feed or feeder run. All you need to do is hang up a cup (that isn't transparent--or else he might try to shoot through the cup instead) and put some feeders inside. This way you can monitor what he is eating without watching and making him feel uncomfortable while he settles in. Here is an example of a feeder run:
https://www.amazon.com/Full-Throttle-Feeders-Magnetic-Chameleon/dp/B081ZVN27L

You can either make your own feeder run or buy one online. Or you can just go to petco and get one of their bird feeder cups with hooks to hang up. https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petco...PqDBmg6hhoS3PwLMY4RoCwAgQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

The above option goes for less than $5.

  • Supplements - in the attached photos and I haven’t cover them with it yet due to the pet store staying they already did it this week so I don’t want to over do it I plan on doing it starting next week.
For supplementation, use the Reptivite with D3 once a month--which also has the necessary multivitamins. Use the plain calcium without D3 at every feeding. It's that simple! However, I'm not too familiar with the Repcal brand and how much calcium carbonate sticks to each feeder, but essentially you want to aim for a light coating of dust--you don't want them to look like "powdered donuts."

  • Watering - i have a mist king that I filtered water in it and it goes off 3 times a day first 3 mins at 8:30. Second one is at 12 for 3 mins and the 3 is at 5:30 for 4 mins and I do not ever see him drinking due to me being at work when it goes off I will see this weekend if he does since this will be the first official weekend id have him for also when I first wake up I mist with my filter spray bottle on the plants just in case he is thirsty
Glad to hear that you have a mistking--it definitely makes misting convenient! The whole community is transitioning away from misting during the day. Instead, we are aiming for high humidity nights and then allowing the cage to dry out during the day. High humidity days paired with warmer temperatures (along with many other variables) are more likely to cause respiratory infections. Aim for 30-50% humidity during the day and 75-100% at night. To determine these levels, you will need to get a hygrometer. You can get a cheap govee one on amazon for about $15 bucks. It's Bluetooth so you can monitor it on your phone when you are within range. I personally don't have one, but other members on here do and they like them a lot. Make sure to keep any hygrometers and temperature probes dry. If the mist hits them directly, it will skew the results.

  • Fecal Description - haven’t seen any I only had him for a little awhile still just 3 days and I haven’t had him tested yet
Alright, just keep an eye out for his poop. He's bound to poop soon. When he does, take a picture and post it in this thread or make a new thread.

  • History - the pet store couldn’t tell me anything because they didn’t no… shameful
His horns are impressive. Makes me wonder if he is a Kenyan Xanth and not a Hawaiian import.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - extra large screen cage I’ll add the photos
The XL cage size is perfect! I'd add more plants in the mid and lower section of the cage. The top part looks perfect with all the plants up there! Additionally, I would add (a lot) more horizontal branches in the cage.

  • Lighting - lighting in the extra photos but the basking buld is 100 w eco smart
IS the ecosmart bulb 100 watts, or a 100-watt equivalent? Regardless, you need to get a temperature probe and place it in the basking spot to see how hot/cold it is. I just searched online for the "ecosmart 100 watt bulb" and Home Depot shows that it is a 100-watt "equivalent" and really only uses 15 watts. If it is only using 15 watts, I can guarantee that your basking spot is too cold. You want the basking site to be between 80 and 85 degrees at the chameleon's back. Anything less is too cold and anything hotter is unneccesarily hot.

Also, follow @Beman's response above for the uvb placement.

  • Temperature - 69 sometimes in middle 70s after mister lowest at night is 68 I know because I have a gun thing that tells me the temp when I point at it
That sounds like a good daytime ambient temperature. With a jackson's chameleon, you should aim for a nighttime temp of 65F and below.

  • Humidity - im not sure I don’t have anything to let me know what it is but I have the misting going and I have shower curtains on the side to keep the humity at a certain level.. I’m trying
You will definitely want to get a hygrometer to measure the day and nighttime humidity. And you are doing a great job so far! Feel free to ask questions anytime, we appreciate your effort, so we are here at your disposal!

P.S--I know this can feel overwhelming, so ask as many questions as you'd like. You are doing great!
 
He looks very thin, but it's a great sign that he is eating. I'd pretty much feed him as much as he will take for the next month or two. But be very careful not to overfeed him past a healthy weight, or he will definitely become obese. You want him to gain weight, but not so much so that his casque (top head structure) becomes puffy or that he gains fat along his spinal ridge. Another good indication is that you don't want his arms to become puffy. You can always post a picture on the forums in a month for us to double-check his weight. But for now, he just needs to gain weight.

It's strange how he won't eat the super worms. How are you offering the super worms and crickets? The easiest and best way (IMO) is to cup feed or feeder run. All you need to do is hang up a cup (that isn't transparent--or else he might try to shoot through the cup instead) and put some feeders inside. This way you can monitor what he is eating without watching and making him feel uncomfortable while he settles in. Here is an example of a feeder run:
https://www.amazon.com/Full-Throttle-Feeders-Magnetic-Chameleon/dp/B081ZVN27L

You can either make your own feeder run or buy one online. Or you can just go to petco and get one of their bird feeder cups with hooks to hang up. https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/product/you-and-me-plastic-bird-cage-cup-small-2431120?cm_mmc=PSH-_-GGL-_-SPP-_-PME-_-PET-_-AQU-_-0-_-PM_GGL_FY21_SBU04_PrivateLabel-You&Me_LIA-SMRT-_-0-_-0&gclid=CjwKCAjwwqaGBhBKEiwAMk-FtGst1_sz5O_uFNxCwtKrUFnXkapnZacETpdPqDBmg6hhoS3PwLMY4RoCwAgQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

The above option goes for less than $5.


For supplementation, use the Reptivite with D3 once a month--which also has the necessary multivitamins. Use the plain calcium without D3 at every feeding. It's that simple! However, I'm not too familiar with the Repcal brand and how much calcium carbonate sticks to each feeder, but essentially you want to aim for a light coating of dust--you don't want them to look like "powdered donuts."


Glad to hear that you have a mistking--it definitely makes misting convenient! The whole community is transitioning away from misting during the day. Instead, we are aiming for high humidity nights and then allowing the cage to dry out during the day. High humidity days paired with warmer temperatures (along with many other variables) are more likely to cause respiratory infections. Aim for 30-50% humidity during the day and 75-100% at night. To determine these levels, you will need to get a hygrometer. You can get a cheap govee one on amazon for about $15 bucks. It's Bluetooth so you can monitor it on your phone when you are within range. I personally don't have one, but other members on here do and they like them a lot. Make sure to keep any hygrometers and temperature probes dry. If the mist hits them directly, it will skew the results.


Alright, just keep an eye out for his poop. He's bound to poop soon. When he does, take a picture and post it in this thread or make a new thread.


His horns are impressive. Makes me wonder if he is a Kenyan Xanth and not a Hawaiian import.


The XL cage size is perfect! I'd add more plants in the mid and lower section of the cage. The top part looks perfect with all the plants up there! Additionally, I would add (a lot) more horizontal branches in the cage.


IS the ecosmart bulb 100 watts, or a 100-watt equivalent? Regardless, you need to get a temperature probe and place it in the basking spot to see how hot/cold it is. I just searched online for the "ecosmart 100 watt bulb" and Home Depot shows that it is a 100-watt "equivalent" and really only uses 15 watts. If it is only using 15 watts, I can guarantee that your basking spot is too cold. You want the basking site to be between 80 and 85 degrees at the chameleon's back. Anything less is too cold and anything hotter is unneccesarily hot.

Also, follow @Beman's response above for the uvb placement.


That sounds like a good daytime ambient temperature. With a jackson's chameleon, you should aim for a nighttime temp of 65F and below.


You will definitely want to get a hygrometer to measure the day and nighttime humidity. And you are doing a great job so far! Feel free to ask questions anytime, we appreciate your effort, so we are here at your disposal!

P.S--I know this can feel overwhelming, so ask as many questions as you'd like. You are doing great!
Wow thank you for all the information I truly appreciate it I’m getting right on it now
 
He looks very thin, but it's a great sign that he is eating. I'd pretty much feed him as much as he will take for the next month or two. But be very careful not to overfeed him past a healthy weight, or he will definitely become obese. You want him to gain weight, but not so much so that his casque (top head structure) becomes puffy or that he gains fat along his spinal ridge. Another good indication is that you don't want his arms to become puffy. You can always post a picture on the forums in a month for us to double-check his weight. But for now, he just needs to gain weight.

It's strange how he won't eat the super worms. How are you offering the super worms and crickets? The easiest and best way (IMO) is to cup feed or feeder run. All you need to do is hang up a cup (that isn't transparent--or else he might try to shoot through the cup instead) and put some feeders inside. This way you can monitor what he is eating without watching and making him feel uncomfortable while he settles in. Here is an example of a feeder run:
https://www.amazon.com/Full-Throttle-Feeders-Magnetic-Chameleon/dp/B081ZVN27L

You can either make your own feeder run or buy one online. Or you can just go to petco and get one of their bird feeder cups with hooks to hang up. https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/product/you-and-me-plastic-bird-cage-cup-small-2431120?cm_mmc=PSH-_-GGL-_-SPP-_-PME-_-PET-_-AQU-_-0-_-PM_GGL_FY21_SBU04_PrivateLabel-You&Me_LIA-SMRT-_-0-_-0&gclid=CjwKCAjwwqaGBhBKEiwAMk-FtGst1_sz5O_uFNxCwtKrUFnXkapnZacETpdPqDBmg6hhoS3PwLMY4RoCwAgQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

The above option goes for less than $5.


For supplementation, use the Reptivite with D3 once a month--which also has the necessary multivitamins. Use the plain calcium without D3 at every feeding. It's that simple! However, I'm not too familiar with the Repcal brand and how much calcium carbonate sticks to each feeder, but essentially you want to aim for a light coating of dust--you don't want them to look like "powdered donuts."


Glad to hear that you have a mistking--it definitely makes misting convenient! The whole community is transitioning away from misting during the day. Instead, we are aiming for high humidity nights and then allowing the cage to dry out during the day. High humidity days paired with warmer temperatures (along with many other variables) are more likely to cause respiratory infections. Aim for 30-50% humidity during the day and 75-100% at night. To determine these levels, you will need to get a hygrometer. You can get a cheap govee one on amazon for about $15 bucks. It's Bluetooth so you can monitor it on your phone when you are within range. I personally don't have one, but other members on here do and they like them a lot. Make sure to keep any hygrometers and temperature probes dry. If the mist hits them directly, it will skew the results.


Alright, just keep an eye out for his poop. He's bound to poop soon. When he does, take a picture and post it in this thread or make a new thread.


His horns are impressive. Makes me wonder if he is a Kenyan Xanth and not a Hawaiian import.


The XL cage size is perfect! I'd add more plants in the mid and lower section of the cage. The top part looks perfect with all the plants up there! Additionally, I would add (a lot) more horizontal branches in the cage.


IS the ecosmart bulb 100 watts, or a 100-watt equivalent? Regardless, you need to get a temperature probe and place it in the basking spot to see how hot/cold it is. I just searched online for the "ecosmart 100 watt bulb" and Home Depot shows that it is a 100-watt "equivalent" and really only uses 15 watts. If it is only using 15 watts, I can guarantee that your basking spot is too cold. You want the basking site to be between 80 and 85 degrees at the chameleon's back. Anything less is too cold and anything hotter is unneccesarily hot.

Also, follow @Beman's response above for the uvb placement.


That sounds like a good daytime ambient temperature. With a jackson's chameleon, you should aim for a nighttime temp of 65F and below.


You will definitely want to get a hygrometer to measure the day and nighttime humidity. And you are doing a great job so far! Feel free to ask questions anytime, we appreciate your effort, so we are here at your disposal!

P.S--I know this can feel overwhelming, so ask as many questions as you'd like. You are doing great!
What light should I get I’m at Petsmart
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Okey so a couple of things.
You need an ordinary daylight aswell, not just uvb and basking light but white light or you know ordinary light, chameleon are very sensitive to light so they need the cues of it during the day to preform normanly, if you can saftly keep it outside in the shade and temperatures are not too hot then it´s perfect.


For gutloading you should read sandrachameleons blog here on the site. She knows her stuff. You should aim for vegetables high in calcium and low in oxalaccid. Turnip greens are the shit. Get dubias, don´t worry abou the worms they are not neccesary. Walking sticks, blue bottle flies _( they love flying insecs) waxmoths larva, P nivea. varitation is the key. Yemens can eat the same feeder all their life. Other species get tired really quick of the same feeders, specially wild caught.

I can´t help you on the uvb, I used to buy the exoterra 8.0 but they start producing bad lighting that burned the skin of some animals ( a friend of mine got his L williamsi skin burn by the light of a new liniar tube)

Supplementations is calcium with D3 once a month, Vitamin a in oil form once a month, other vitamins once a month. Trioceros are sensitive to over supplementations. Calcium Without D3 in every feeding.

Feeding you should feed him 3 times a week or every other day. He is an adult they don´t eat every day. HE should not be fat that causes alot of other problems.

Temperatur at night the temperatures should be lower than 20 Celcius. you should aim for 15 celcium, getting an AC would be good. At day basking temps 27, ambient temp 23-25.

More branches in the cage. You live in florida so I would not stress about air humidity being to low. Let the cage dry between waterings. and most of the humidity should be at night.

and btw gutlaod with spritrulina aswell. Good source of protein.
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
@Ima_smile_back, as you can see firsthand, two different chameleon keepers can have two different husbandry parameters with total success. @leedragon provides a lot of great information; however, I will say this, there is no need for liquid vitamin A since you are using reptivite that has preformed vitamin A. I can't think of anyone else besides leedragon who uses liquid vitamin A--which works great for him and there seems to be nothing wrong with using it. Other than that minor note, I have no argument with what he presented.

The vast majority of my care parameters come from chameleon academy: https://chameleonacademy.com/the-jacksons-chameleon-trioceros-jacksonii/ which provides tons of information that you can read over to get a better understanding of chameleons.

Also, if you want a good gut-load that is easy to prepare, check out Repashy Bug Burger: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DLI6H6E/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
phosphor free calcium btw. the phosphore: calcium ration in insects is normally unbalanced as it is so there is no need to add more phosphore to their diet via calcium powder.
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
@Ima_smile_back, as you can see firsthand, two different chameleon keepers can have two different husbandry parameters with total success. @leedragon provides a lot of great information; however, I will say this, there is no need for liquid vitamin A since you are using reptivite that has preformed vitamin A. I can't think of anyone else besides leedragon who uses liquid vitamin A--which works great for him and there seems to be nothing wrong with using it. Other than that minor note, I have no argument with what he presented.

The vast majority of my care parameters come from chameleon academy: https://chameleonacademy.com/the-jacksons-chameleon-trioceros-jacksonii/ which provides tons of information that you can read over to get a better understanding of chameleons.

Also, if you want a good gut-load that is easy to prepare, check out Repashy Bug Burger: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DLI6H6E/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
It solved alot of problems for a friend of mine with his animals, later he was able to breed several generations of hoehnelii that previous to that had eye issues. His merus showed the same symptons aswell if I remember correctly before he find the proformed vitam A. But if it works for you it works for you.
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
It solved alot of problems for a friend of mine with his animals, later he was able to breed several generations of hoehnelii that previous to that had eye issues. His merus showed the same symptons aswell if I remember correctly before he find the proformed vitam A. But if it works for you it works for you.
That's awesome! And I agree. There is definitely more than one way to skin a cat. Do you know what multivitamin they were using that led up to the eye issues? Did it have a preformed vitamin A or Proformed (carotenoids)?

I definitely don't discount the use of liquid vitamin A. Also, the quality of supplements over here in the states may be different than the supplements over there. If I ever get Merus (given I can provide constant temp drops below 59 degrees and that Tanzania reopens), I might have to ask for your friend's info. Do you know what temps he kept them at and if he had success breeding them?
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
That's awesome! And I agree. There is definitely more than one way to skin a cat. Do you know what multivitamin they were using that led up to the eye issues? Did it have a preformed vitamin A or Proformed (carotenoids)?

I definitely don't discount the use of liquid vitamin A. Also, the quality of supplements over here in the states may be different than the supplements over there. If I ever get Merus (given I can provide constant temp drops below 59 degrees and that Tanzania reopens), I might have to ask for your friend's info. Do you know what temps he kept them at and if he had success breeding them?
always proformed. And the issue was due the lack of vitamin a. I think, I am not sure, he was not supplimenting with vitamin a before that. Neither he or I knew you need to specifically supplmenet for that and what happens when your animal is lacking it. I can ask him next time we speak but he keep salamanders aswell so he had an AC if I recall correctly and could get lower temperatures that were confortable for all the animals. He no longer keep animals. He started with merus and switched to hoehnellis. it was back in 2013 I believe when they wera available, he switched up to hoehneliis and some pygmies species.

This was his facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/Slowmotionacrobats-714642918655340
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
Have you tried a preformed vitamin A dust/powder supplement? I know that many people speculate/theorize that only a few species can convert proformed A (carotenoids (beta carotenes)) into preformed A (retinol) which would make sense if your friend had eye issues despite supplementing with proformed vitamin A.

I checked out your friend's Facebook page and it's impressive! It seems like he had tons of success with rhampholeon spinosus which is really cool! I'm thinking about making the leap into pygmies when the next Madagascar import comes in. While I'm a sucker for the rhampholeon genus, the brookesia genus will do nicely until Tanzania reopens.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just got him 3 days ago rescued from pet shop tell me how I’m doing please advice will be greatly appreciated also need to pick which name would be best Cutter or Casper
  • Your Chameleon - Jackson, I’ve had him for 3 days
  • Handling - Held him first day haven’t since
  • Feeding - crickets he won’t try super worms yet idk why but he ate 9 crickets the second day and he only ate 3 this morning. I feed him in the morning but I may try to feed him when I get home I get home about 5 something i gut loaded them by feeding the crickets carrots and lettuce and and potato's
  • Supplements - in the attached photos and I haven’t cover them with it yet due to the pet store staying they already did it this week so I don’t want to over do it I plan on doing it starting next week
  • Watering - i have a mist king that I filtered water in it and it goes off 3 times a day first 3 mins at 8:30. Second one is at 12 for 3 mins and the 3 is at 5:30 for 4 mins and I do not ever see him drinking due to me being at work when it goes off I will see this weekend if he does since this will be the first official weekend id have him for also when I first wake up I mist with my filter spray bottle on the plants just in case he is thirsty
  • Fecal Description - haven’t seen any I only had him for a little awhile still just 3 days and I haven’t had him tested yet
  • History - the pet store couldn’t tell me anything because they didn’t no… shameful

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - extra large screen cage I’ll add the photos
  • Lighting - lighting in the extra photos but the basking buld is 100 w eco smart
  • Temperature - 69 sometimes in middle 70s after mister lowest at night is 68 I know because I have a gun thing that tells me the temp when I point at it
  • Humidity - im not sure I don’t have anything to let me know what it is but I have the misting going and I have shower curtains on the side to keep the humity at a certain level.. I’m trying
  • Plants - corn plant and a Lucca also in picture
  • Placement - he sat high up as you can see in the added picture and no vent is near him in our guest bed room which no one is in but he is near a window
  • Location - I live in Florida
Just a quick note: nightime temp of 68 is too warm, in my opinion. Below 60 is better
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Have you tried a preformed vitamin A dust/powder supplement? I know that many people speculate/theorize that only a few species can convert proformed A (carotenoids (beta carotenes)) into preformed A (retinol) which would make sense if your friend had eye issues despite supplementing with proformed vitamin A.

I checked out your friend's Facebook page and it's impressive! It seems like he had tons of success with rhampholeon spinosus which is really cool! I'm thinking about making the leap into pygmies when the next Madagascar import comes in. While I'm a sucker for the rhampholeon genus, the brookesia genus will do nicely until Tanzania reopens.
No. about that time there was a study done with yemens that showed they were not able to convert betta carrotein to vitamina a. And thus the reoccuring symptons of vitamin a lacking in chameleons in captivity. I remember seeing in geckosunlimited.com that people started to reffer to this study as areason to supply their geckos aswell with proformed vitamin a. Funny enough, I can not for the life of me find that study. But It was post here in the forums when it was done.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just my two cents worth: Read the Derrenfield study before jumping to any conclusions. The short and dirty version is that that the abundance of beta carotene in F. pardalis eggs—compared to poultry eggs—might suggest that such carotenoids are not efficiently converted into vitamin A. Several things are important to note here:

1) the carotenoids in question are beta carotene and beta cryptoxanthin—both converted to retinol by us humans, and poultry.

2) An abundance of these carotenoids at the time of laying could mean that said carotenoids cannot be converted to retinol, or that there is an abundance of said carotenoids in the diet…full stop

3) just because beta carotene and beta cryptoxanthin are the primary carotenoids involved in human conversion of vitamin A, doesn’t mean those are the carotenoids used by all organisms

4) as far as I know, there isn’t a definitive answer about how wild chams get their vitamin A. While the occasional ingestion of vertebrates might account for retinol consumption for the larger species, it’s not a good answer for smaller species.

All-in-all, we just don’t know how chameleons get their vitamin A. But it’s clear that wild chameleons do get it. So, we can hedge our bets, and give them occasional doses of retinol in powdered form, but my intuitions are that we ought to devote some serious attention to our insect feeding regimes. By all means, play it safe by giving occasional doses of pre-formed vitamin A, but know that that is a convenient placeholder for an unknown variable.
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just my two cents worth: Read the Derrenfield study before jumping to any conclusions. The short and dirty version is that that the abundance of beta carotene in F. pardalis eggs—compared to poultry eggs—might suggest that such carotenoids are not efficiently converted into vitamin A. Several things are important to note here:

1) the carotenoids in question are beta carotene and beta cryptoxanthin—both converted to retinol by us humans, and poultry.

2) An abundance of these carotenoids at the time of laying could mean that said carotenoids cannot be converted to retinol, or that there is an abundance of said carotenoids in the diet…full stop

3) just because beta carotene and beta cryptoxanthin are the primary carotenoids involved in human conversion of vitamin A, doesn’t mean those are the carotenoids used by all organisms

4) as far as I know, there isn’t a definitive answer about how wild chams get their vitamin A. While the occasional ingestion of vertebrates might account for retinol consumption for the larger species, it’s not a good answer for smaller species.

All-in-all, we just don’t know how chameleons get their vitamin A. But it’s clear that wild chameleons do get it. So, we can hedge our bets, and give them occasional doses of retinol in powdered form, but my intuitions are that we ought to devote some serious attention to our insect feeding regimes. By all means, play it safe by giving occasional doses of pre-formed vitamin A, but know that that is a convenient placeholder for an unknown variable.
I misstake there come from flies, I believe Necas documented that flies are part of quite a few chameleons species, even big ones you wouldn´t expect to eat such small prey items. I think kiniongya or someelse wrote about butterflies and A vitamin, I don´t remember how it was. Fat larvees, A vitamin is fat soluble and chameleons do go crazy when they see larvee, + flying insects, there maybe something there?
 
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